Film Analysis: The Shape Of Water

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The Shape of Water (2017) demonstrated a phenomenal performance through the intricacies of love, loneliness, and friendship. The movie was backed with a terrific ensemble cast. Sally Hawkins plays the lead character, Eliza Esposito, as a lonely mute janitor at a secret government laboratory. Doug Jones plays the Amphibian Man who is tortured at the secret laboratory, but it is able to spark a romantic relationship with Esposito. Richard Jenkins plays the role of Giles, Esposito’s gay friend that is trying to sale his professional paintings. Octavia Spencer performs the role of Zelda, a janitor that is Esposito’s colleague, friend, and translator at work. Lastly, Michael Shannon acts as Strickland, a sadistic colonel who captured the Amphibian…show more content…
Esposito’s eyes are a gateway to true love in this movie. Her adoring eyes tell a story of longing, desire, and passion. The eye to eye contact the Amphibian Man and Esposito share are some of the most precious moments in the movie. During a pivotal moment in the movie, Esposito sign languages to Giles “When he looks at me, the way he looks at me... He does not know, what I lack... Or - how - I am incomplete. He sees me, for what I - am, as I am. He 's happy - to see me. Every time. Every day. Now, I can either save him... or let him die.” This scenes translate to unconditional love. Esposito’s face is bright and smiling softly because of the warmth she feel, yet sincere and serious because of the dire situation. As seen with her looks of concern, Esposito desperately want her friend to back to her. When Esposito thinks of the Amphibian Man she cannot help by smile. There is so much emotion that Esposito has to constantly be portraying through facial expressions alone since she is mute and we cannot hear the tone of her voice. Even the Amphibian Man looks at Esposito with wonder. He tilts his head, gazes intensely and has a leaning in posture towards Esposito. While a lot of the Amphibian Man’s character is displayed through costume design and some of face being CGI, his acting of love is reciprocal to Esposito’s through virtue of his stance. His posture is more human when he is around…show more content…
He finds pleasure in hurting the Amphibian Man and Esposito. He sees the Amphibian Man as an unintelligent creature that is denied basic human rights. Strickland says sexual assault innuendos to Esposito. The audience can see his distaste through his facial expressions. He rarely smiles unless he is tormenting someone. In the beginning when he questions Esposito and Zelda about who they are, his tone of voice is harsh and angry. His eyebrows always seem to be slanting down to show his displease. His stands upright when he becomes more of a dictator. The movie’s cinematography highlights his position of authoritative power by shooting low angles. When the character is even angrier his eye brows become more pointed down, and he grinds his teeth. Strickland never seems out of character, and comes across as disliked. If Strickland’s character did not come across as disliked, then the actor did not do his
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