Buster Keaton IV: The Silent Film Industry

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Joseph Frank Keaton IV, commonly known as Buster Keaton was an American comedian, actor, director, and producer. He was born in October 4, 1895 in Piqua, Kansas and died in February 1, 1996 due lung cancer. He was known as the “Great Stone Face” and also for his expression and visual comedy in silent film industry. Born in a family of vaudeville, he was the oldest among three siblings. He has one brother name Harry and a sister name Louise. Buster got his name from a magician called Houdini when he saw buster falling from a stair and got unharmed. Basically, he started his acting career at a very young age of 3 in his parent’s act. It is said that their acts were said to be roughest act in vaudeville as buster was hit by his fathers with sticks…show more content…
Composing, directing, and starring in these movies, Keaton made a world not at all like the other comic stars of the circumstances. Where Harold Lloyd combat physical misfortune attempting to make it to the best, and Charlie Chaplin maintained a strategic distance from fiasco through fortunes and cooperative attitude, Keaton was an onlooker, an explorer made up for lost time in his environment. He frequently wound up in an indistinguishable trading off conditions from Chaplin and Lloyd (pursued by a furious group, deserted by a prepare), yet he kept up a feeling of even self-restraint all through. Regardless of how lost or discouraged Keaton appeared to be, he was never one to be felt sorry for. The NEW YORK TIMES said of him, "In a film world that misrepresented everything, and in which each feeling was performed and explained, he stayed indifferent and grave, his poker-confronted uncertainty smothering all feeling." It was this "stone face," in any case, that came to speak to a feeling of good faith and everlasting curiosity. The Navigator, The General and The Cameraman were some movies where Keaton depicted characters whose physical capacities appeared to be totally dependent upon their environment. He was mainly known for his real-life stunts. So being knows as a stunt performer, buster could venture back and forth on a moving train with a ease as it’s a piece of cake for him. Regularly inconsistent with the physical world, his capacity to gullibly adjust conveyed a despairing sweetness to the movies. Unlike others, Buster comedy timing and facial expression made everyone amazed. In his mid-two-reelers the snicker making incorporated a dominance of the slapstick pie. His work likewise highlighted Keaton's inclination for doing his own tricks, and he turned out to be to some degree a Hollywood legend not only for his falls but rather for his absence of

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