The River In Siddhartha

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Question 9.2 The river in Siddhartha is extremely important. It is represented both literally and figuratively. The literal aspect of the river is to obviously allow drinking water and transportation. More importantly, the river serves as a border between Siddhartha’s double lives. On one side is Siddhartha’s past, being a Samana and acquiring wealth, on the other side is Siddhartha’s rejuvenated and focused life. Water is a great central motif in all religions. Water represents change, and growth. The river itself is parallel to human life. Life is constantly moving, but can experience violent turbulence and unrest but eventually will calm down, similar to the flow of water in a river. When Vasudeva asks Siddhartha to look and learn from…show more content…
Siddhartha first encounters the ferryman after leaving Gotama(The Buddha) and Govinda. Vasudeva only believes and trusts the river. The river provides him work and transportation, but most importantly knowledge. He rarely speaks but when he does he provides great knowledge for Siddhartha. Siddhartha has always wanted a teacher figure that will not force him to follow a certain path. Vasudeva fits the criteria of Siddhartha’s teacher, who will let Siddhartha learn based on his own experiences, but will point Siddhartha in the right direction. A desperate and suicidal Siddhartha finds his focus with the great help of Vasudeva. Siddhartha’s path to enlighten was on a crash course, but after being an apprentice to Vasudeva, Siddhartha is finally again on the right…show more content…
The spoilt child dislikes living in such a poor place. Siddhartha’s love for his son had falsely motivated him to be patient with his rebellious son. Siddhartha’s son despises Siddhartha. Siddhartha and his son are distant, not only in location, but also on the way the view the world. Siddhartha wants his child to be like him, to learn from the glorious river. Siddhartha and his son differ in many ways, including that Siddhartha needs his son, but the child dislikes his father. Siddhartha’s son does not need his father at all, but Siddhartha truly longs for his son. To Siddhartha, his son is the only person left that he truly loves. Siddhartha understands that for both him and his son to have a good life, they have to be separate. Similar to Siddhartha’s youth, his son also feels trapped in his current fundamentally different environment. Siddhartha lets his son go, because he knows he did the same thing and understands that his son will be
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