Sigmund Freud's Theory

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Sigmund Freud was the founder of Psychoanalysis and Psychodynamic psychological approaches. He discovered the unconscious, the complexity of human ego, and many other psychological theories (BMJ, 1936). The purpose of the therapy was to bring repressed thoughts or conflicts into consciousness, thus helping the patient gain insight into the processes of his/her unconscious. By doing so, it was thought to aid in healing. Psychoanalysis is used today as a treatment while also still being theorized. Freud often used techniques such as free association and dream analysis. Exploring stressors, memories, and feelings (that have led to psychological debilitation) in a safe environment can contribute to long-term emotional growth. Freud’s work has been…show more content…
Free association involves refraining from any conscious thinking and just saying whatever comes into your head. Freud also believed that emotional excitement of a sexual nature was within the cause of many psychoneuroses and other psychological phenomena (Tansley, 1941). Freudian Theories I A. Theory of the Unconscious Mind: The choices we make are governed by the unconscious mind through hidden mental processes. The mind is can neither be identified with consciousness, or be an object of consciousness. Instincts are the motivational forces of the mental realm. He sought after the explanation and causes of the neurotic behavior of persons of differing mental states (Thornton, n.d.). His tripartite model of the structure of the mind or personality Three structural components of the mind Id, ego and super-ego The debate is how literal one should take Freud’s model and whether Freud intended it to be literal or theoretical. It functions as a frame of reference for the link between and the personality of a mature adult. Freudian Theories…show more content…
He was driven by curiosity, constantly questioning existing ideas and pushing the boundaries of current science. In my future career, I also hope to continue to learn about new ideas and processes as well as work to help the lives of many patients. Why Sigmund Freud should be APA President Freud’s contributions have greatly benefited and influenced the field psychology so far, and will continue to do so in the future. His findings of the unconscious are still the most thorough after all of these years. There are more psychologists challenging his theories on a daily basis, but this fact remains true: His influence today is still causing current psychologists to challenge him. The mission of the American Psychological Association (APA) is to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to improve lives and communities. Freud’s work has been driven by his desire to help his patients. His ideas have improved our community through inspiration and
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