Zelda And The Great Gatsby

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Francis Scott Fitgerald has a very curious life as a short story writer and a novelist. He is well known, and has the most success, for his novel, The Great Gatsby. Erika Willett writes, "The Fitzgeralds enjoyed fame and fortune, and his novels reflected their lifestyle, describing in semi-autobiographical fiction the privileged lives of wealthy, aspiring socialites. Fitzgerald wrote his second novel - "The Beautiful and the Damned" a year after they were married. Three years later, after the birth of their first and only child, Scottie, Fitzgerald completed his best-known work: "The Great Gatsby." Although the fame and fortune have its uproars, it also has its downfalls. The rich living helped the Fitzgeralds not to struggle financially, however…show more content…
Tom and Daisy are a part of the old money and are very rich and live lavishly. Daisy likes the idea of a big, strong man with a lot of money. Tom likes the idea of a social and gorgeous wife. Zelda and Fitzgerald share similar interests because prior to their engagement, Zelda would not marry him because Scott did not have enough money as she wanted him to have. After he had a huge breakthrough with his novel, he began to be rich. Once she started to see that, she married him. But, like both relationships here, money gets in the way and clouds their vision. Tom is abusing Daisy 's emotions and Scott starts abusing alcohol. These couples are able to be compared but are just as easily able to be contrasted. Tom cheats on Daisy and has mistresses, but on the other hand, an audience is able to assume that Fitzgerald was there for his wife all throughout her mental illnesses. Another character Scott 's lifestyle is able to be compared to is Gatsby. Gatsby is so caught up with a luxury lifestyle and indulges in materialistic items. Fitzgerald, is the same way. He gets so caught up in a rich and famous lifestyle that he indulges in alcohol, which is materialistic, and is not able to let go. Gatsby has a big, extravagant house to be able for people to be able to set the bar for his social status. Scott, once he reached his fame and fortune, started producing even more books, novels, and…show more content…
For insight in a small portion of his life, history.com staff states, "The Fitzgeralds’ frenetic ascent to literary fame was soon tinged with tragedy. Scott became an alcoholic and Zelda, jealous of his fame (or in some versions, thwarted by it), collapsed into madness. They crept home in 1931 to an America in the grip of the Great Depression—a land no longer interested in flaming youth except to pillory them for their excesses." This quote is an example of a downfall from one who participates in living a lifestyle like Scott lives. For example, after the Fitzgeralds tries to escape and move all across the globe, it seemed like everywhere he went he was rejected and every
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