Similarities Between An Occurrence At Owl Creek Bridge And The Hitchhiker

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“An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” vs “The Hitchhiker” To a lot of people water tastes different. For example, lots of people say faucet water is revolting opposed to brand, bottled water, but water is water right? The two different types of water have a variety of differences in taste that people have pointed out, but even though the water has its differences, it still comes down to at least one similarity. It has a lot of similarities like the stories purposes, but it still has its differences. The same can be said about two short stories written way differently but still have many similarities.“An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” is a short story about a man named Peyton Farquhar, he is sentenced death at Owl Creek Bridge and has to be …show more content…

In “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” the imagination of the main character is expressed in a positive way, he thinks of his family, home and happy things. “He closed his eyes in order to fix his last thoughts upon his wife and children” (Bierce 2). However, in “The Hitchhiker” the character’s imagination is expressed in the opposite manner. The character’s imagination is expressed through creepy, stalkerish, words because of this mysterious man “following” the main character. “I was- I was afraid to stop now” (Fletcher 17). “Yet the thought of picking him up, of having him sit beside me, was somehow unbearable” (Fletcher …show more content…

They both use specific details to create a mood for every scene. The use of specific details is also used to make every scene seem realistic so that the readers would believe it was all reality up until the end where they figure out that it was all just the character’s wild imagination. For example, in “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” the author uses specific details to describe the character’s escape to make it realistic, “By diving I could evade the bullets and, swimming vigorously, reach the bank, take to the woods and get away home” (Bierce 2). And in “The Hitchhiker” the author uses specific details to describe how real this mysterious man was to the main character, saying, “There was nothing sinister about him. He was as drab as a mud fence, nor was his attitude menacing. He merely stood there- waiting, almost dropping a little” (Fletcher

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