Similarities Between France And Germany

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The European world, historically, has been shaped by political feuds and war. Particularly England, France, and especially Germany. These conflicts have altered the way each of these country’s governments function politically, economically, and culturally. The electoral systems of France and Germany are where we see stark differences in how each country votes, but also their institutions and culture differ on many levels. While there exist some similarities, for example, both England and Germany have a parliamentary system of government, they are not completely identical. Despite these differences, however, (with the exception of England now) each country is bound to one another economically and politically by the European Union. The…show more content…
Parliamentary or, the presidential system. Both England and Germany put great stock in the power of the parliament and its abilities to legislate, rather than a single figure head to lead the government. France, on the other hand, contrasts greatly with the former countries mentioned. The French use what is called a semi-presidential system. Essentially, the system fuses the role of the executive and the legislative. The French government is led by a dual executive system in which the president is elected directly by the people of France, and then in turn the newly elected president selects a member of parliament to serve as the Prime Minister of government. Typically the two serve in coordination with one another, with the Prime Minister acting as a junior partner, unless if parliament is in cohabitation. This system, while has a parliament, entrusts a great deal of power and influence into the President’s hands. This is not common with either Germany or…show more content…
Both nations in a sense have a voting system which requires its citizens to vote either on two different measures, or two separate times, they are similar in a sense, but function completely differently. In France the two round system functions so that there is a greater likelihood that a coalition can be formed once the members have been elected to serve in parliament. For a candidate to be elected they must first receive the majority of their district in order to compete in the run-off elections, or 12.5% of the voters. This means that multiple candidates can be qualified to compete in the second election process, which usually occurs a few weeks after the first. There are a number of downsides to this method, however, many of which have led to a decline in voter turnout for the two most important elections in France: The President, and parliament. The most pressing issue to French voters is that of representation. Many do not feel that this system properly reflects their vote because the political coalitions within parliament that form, do not represent them as they should. This has led to other issues beyond voter turnout, but also larger popularity towards fringe parties and mass corruption among politicians. Many French citizens do not take their government seriously due to
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