Similarities Between Frankenstein And Ex Machina

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In 1959, psychologist Harry Harlow conducted an experiment on baby monkeys to demonstrate the importance of nurturing infants and the effects of a lack of compassion and love. The idea of abandonment also applies to the two narratives Frankenstein by Mary Shelley and Ex Machina by Alex Garland. While Victor Frankenstein neglects the monster and Nathan Bateman neglects his robots, the two stories share a similar message that neglecting one’s creation leads to foul consequences. The monster and the robot being treated as objects from the beginning cause the creations to hate their creator, Nathan and Victor. Next, Ava and Frankenstein’s monster receive a lack of nurturing; neither creator took in the moral considerations of raising a human and …show more content…

Victor’s lack of compassion is evident when he “beheld the wretch” and immediately “escaped and rushed downstairs” (Shelley 49). When Victor abandons his monster, the creation’s abandonment forces him to nurture himself with no moral compass of right and wrong; the monster teaches himself tasks such as preparing food, speaking English and using human senses. The monster concludes that his lack of nurturing and guidance is to blame on humans. The monster questions why there are “none among the myriads of men that existed who would pity or assist me” since no humans helped nurture the monster, he resorts to evil and “declared everlasting war against the species [humans], and more than all, against him [Victor] who had formed me [monster]” (Shelley 137). To conclude, Frankenstein’s monster is angered and thus his lack of nurturing causes him to resort to evil, such as killing Elizabeth and William, in order to resolve his problem. The creations in Ex Machina and Frankenstein have a lack of nurturing and guidance. This type of neglect leads to evil behavior and in return, the evil behavior creates violent …show more content…

In effect, the monster is angered to hate humans. When he is neglected and treated like an enemy, the way he is treated frustrates the monster because he is faced with crudeness; even though he has only done kind-hearted tasks for humans, such as collecting firewood or clearing paths. This concludes that his isolation from human society changes him to evil and drives him to attack humans. Ava and the monster are forcefully isolated from human society. The rejections demonstrated in Ex Machina and Frankenstein indicate that neglecting one’s creation results in

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