Similarities Between The Scarlet Letter And The Crucible

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The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne, and The Crucible by Arthur Miller, both share similarities as well as differences through the shared puritan beliefs and themes utilized by the authors. In both texts, the puritan beliefs that existed during the time period revealed all the characters’ true colors due to the pressure of the communities. However, both texts also obtain different themes like sin and deceit then completely separating their plot lines from one another. Though these works are often associated with one another, the authors made sure to include different themes thus making them more appealing individually. For example, The Scarlet Letter obtains the theme of sin, where the characters’ true personalities and emotions are …show more content…

A quote in the novel exposes the outcome of sin committed among the characters, “…relieve the darkening close of a tale of human frailty and sorrow,” (Hawthorne, 1850, p. 60). Through Dimmesdale’s self-torment, the reader is able to recognize the amount of guilt he feels from the affair. It was a crime of passion, and the sin he committed in his moment of weakness ultimately led to his destruction. Chillingworth is instrumental in expressing another theme, the lust for revenge is due to his “hatred, by a gradual and quiet process…a continually new irritation of the original feeling of hostility,” (Hawthorne, 1850, p. 256). Chillingworth’s one-sided intentions get him nowhere and being drowned in hatred ultimately leads to his death. He is displayed as the most malevolent character in the entire book due to his single-minded pursuits of retribution. …show more content…

A quote in the novel exposes the outcome of dishonesty committed among the characters, “ ‘I told him everything; he knows now, he knows everything we’—…'You didn't tell him that,’ ” (Miller, 1953, p. 18). The reader is able to better understand the motives behind Abigail’s actions. In order to protect herself, she utilizes threats of violence the keep the girls from telling the truth. Because she believes the obtains some witchcraft, she tries to keep the group of girls in line. The community’s strong belief in the supernatural is evident throughout the play, “let him look to medicine and put out all thought of unnatural causes here. There be none,” (Miller, 1953, p. 8). The concept of supernatural is very real to the puritan community of Salem. Though they see proof of God and the Devil everywhere, nobody actually see spirits (besides the girls who claim they do). The possibility of witchcraft dwelling in Salem completely overcomes the people from reality and making rational decisions thus leading to several unreasonable events then shaping the plot. Everyone in the community suddenly becomes obsessed with justice while always looking for someone to blame, “who else may surely tell us what person murdered my babies?” (Miller, 1953, p. 15). Because God is supposed to be the ultimate leader setting a basis

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