Similes In The Gilded Age

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The Gilded Age. A point in history where industries took advantage of their workers and lied to the government about it. Men, women, and children alike were extremely undervalued. Whether it was low pay, long hours, or unsafe work environments people in this time were not being treated as they should have. In theory as years go by things will change. Eric Schlosser disproves that theory with his book titled Fast Food Nation (2001). About a hundred years after the mistreatment in the Gilded Age occured Fast Food Nation describes the same if not worse conditions of industries in America. In chapter 8, Schlosser uses rhetorical strategies to unveil the dark side of meat-packing factories.
Schlosser begins by explaining what happens to the animals
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The reason Schlosser chose to go into the meat-packing plant himself was so the reader trusted him; and therefore could believe what he described. Next, Schlosser uses similes to describe his experience within the plant. Schlosser describes how the deeper he went into the plant the worse and more horrific it got. At first he says it just looks like the “back of your local supermarket”, but then he explains how it gets violent, and more slaughterhouse-like (169). The simile is meant to highlight the darkness of the plant on the inside rather than what it is expected to be. It is implied that most people don’t know what truly happens inside a meat-packing plant (170). This shows.......... Schlosser also uses imagery to further this shock in the reader. He says he sees men reach inside cattle with “bare hands” to pull out livers (170). As Schlosser explains this sight the readers shock is heightened and starts to establish pathos. The reader is supposed to feel sickened and sad about these events. Next, Schlosser uses a variety of diction to convey more pathos. He uses certain words to emphasize the things he sees and hears in the slaughterhouse. He says he hears the “pop” of live animals being stunned, and sees the steel rack of tongues
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