Simon Lord Of The Flies

629 Words3 Pages
Simon’s first action on the island, as expected, was to faint as his group of choir boys found the rest of the boys marooned on this island. After awaking, and losing some layers, Simon’s next action was to become one of the most vitally important boys on the island without anyone really noticing. Simon, by nature, is a secondary character, meant to stay in the background, making occasional contributions, but not really meant to develop the story in any way. This would be the case in most other stories, but in The Lord of the Flies by Robert Golding, Simon serves one of the greatest and most important roles of all of the boys: Simon is the brain of the group. Through his consistent positive thinking and ideas, civilized actions and ideologies, and selfless thinking and actions, Simon becomes a complete necessity for the group’s survival. Simon consistently contributed positive ideas to the group, and without that infusion of positivity and thoughtfulness, the group would have collapsed much sooner. When Ralph was struggling to keep hope, Simon was right there to keep him going. An instance of this really stood out, when Ralph appeared concerned and stressed, and Simon reassured him that “ [He’ll] get back to where [he] came…show more content…
When he discovers the Lord of the Flies, it actually speaks to him, because the Lord of the Flies represents evil, while Simon represents holiness and good. The Lord of the Flies asks Simon “aren’t you afraid of me?” and instead of folding, Simon fights the evil, and shakes his head no (Golding 143). He can also see the corruption of his fellow peers, and the civilization leaving the group. Simon takes the beast as man, man that was once “heroic and sick” but is not corrupt and savage (Golding 103). Though his civilized and positive nature both make him valuable, his selfless actions really cement him as a necessary part of the
Open Document