Simone De Beauvoir Feminism

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Let us start with a quote by one of the most prominent French writers and most important figures in the twentieth century, Simone de Beauvoir – “One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman.” I personally think that this is the single-most appropriate way that best describes how feminism is a social construct which means that the roles that are associated with women, or those that are assigned to them, are not given by biological nature, but are actually defined by social norms, and history. Feminism is an assortment of Ideologies and movements which common goal is to establish and achieve equal political, economic, cultural, and social rights for women. Écriture feminine is the French translation of “women’s writing” which means the inscription…show more content…
In her book, Beauvoir does not deny the apparent differences of men and women in a biological sense. Although given those, she argues that those differences are defined by culture, not “natural facts”, and is not sufficient to give a good reason to oppress…show more content…
The conspicuous inquiry which emerges is: How did such a framework appear? In The Second Sex, she gives a careful study of the starting points and propagation of the patriarchal abuse of ladies. She clarifies that, since the start of social association, men, as physically more grounded creatures, were better adjusted to substantial manual work included in chasing, angling and guarding the tribe. Ladies were included in residential work and bringing up kids. Men thusly had more opportunity to design frameworks of thought and social and political association in light of the fact that they didn't bear kids. With these given, social and political frameworks are then created to support male activities instead of society's interests as a whole. Ladies have been obliged to adjust to this patriarchal framework, which looks after them in a subordinate
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