Slavery In Huckleberry Finn

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Racism and slavery are two obvious aspects of the novel The Adventures Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. The setting of the novel sets the tone of the story. Twain 's interesting choice of setting depicts his possible view on slavery. Throughout the novel a relationship grows between teenager Huck Finn and a run away slave named Jim and the use of language in The Adventures Huckleberry Finn allows readers to get a glimpse of racism through the word nigger. The societal views on race and slavery influence Huck and his views. A significant moment occurs when Huck changes his view on slavery toward the end of the novel. The events that Huck and Jim experience together bring about freedom at the conclusion of the novel. All of the experiences that…show more content…
The setting of The Adventures Huckleberry Finn is pre-Civil War. Interesting enough, Twain wrote this work post-Civil War. Questions arise as to why Twain did this. Perhaps he was portraying that not much has changed with the abolishment of slavery at the end of the Civil War. Racism was still greatly prevalent while Twain wrote down Huck and Jim 's adventures. Twain may be trying to show that racism can still be seen in everyday life. Even today, in the year 2016, racism is seen in everyday life. The issue of racism gives The Adventures Huckleberry Finn a timeless feeling, as all time periods can relate to it. From pre-Civil War to Post-Civil War, and from the Civil Rights Movement to Black Lives Matter issues of the present, racism is unfortunately…show more content…
Because of the ongoing themes of racism and slavery in The Adventures Huckleberry Finn, a timeless classic was born. The setting, societal views, use of the word nigger, and the relationship that is established between Huck and Jim all give evidence to show that the themes of racism and slavery designate this novel as a timeless classic. Mark Twain 's words worked through Huck to show that racism is not dead but very much still alive. The hope that humanity will one day be able to have the, "I’ll go to hell,” realization that young Huck did is something that will make the population feel like they are drifting to freedom on Huck and Jim
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