Slavery: The Interesting Narrative Of Olaudah Equiano

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The Interesting Narrative of Olaudah Equiano depicts an African man’s journey through slavery and freedom. Equiano was influenced by the British and eventually tried to persuade the British to abolish slavery. The expressions offered by Equiano symbolize a man of intelligence and understanding. During the eighteenth-century Equiano was known as an African and a British man. This paper will argue how slavery did not define Equiano’s intelligence as a man. Equiano was born as an Igbo in Nigeria during seventeen forty-five. At the age of eleven Equiano was taken captive and sold into slavery. During slavery he was named “Olaudah, which in our language, signifies vicissitude, or fortunate also; one favored (Equaino 41)” There are a variety of names that Equiano is given during his captivity. Identity was something that those ruling during enslavement did not want to become an issue amongst the slaves. Having an identity would draw attention to independence and self-recognition. The name that Equiano…show more content…
“I had never seen among people such instances of brutal cruelty (Equaino 56).” Cruelty was not only shown towards blacks but also among whites. The British were people of such noble and high standards, but they were seeking to low levels by enslaving humans just as the rest of the world. The horrors that occurred during the middle passage are detailed as gruesome and appalling. Inhumanity was a major issue during the middle passage. Slaves were treated as property with little value. Beatings and assaults occurred in various places along the slave trade. Also, because of the prosperous slave trade, slaves were sold suddenly and had no time to say goodbye to their families. This narrative brought readers attention to the reasons behind slavery and why this cruel journey continued to take place during the eighteenth century. Slaves were being used for work to benefit economies around the

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