Social Consequences In To Kill A Mockingbird

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26. Jem and Scout are facing many social consequences because Atticus is representing Tom Robinson. Other children at school and sometimes even their own neighbors are calling their father offensive names and speaking poorly of him. As a result, Jem and Scout sometimes go to extreme lengths to defend Atticus and his name. Scout got into multiple fights with her classmates because they taunted her father, which allows the readers to assume that Scout does not react to the taunting and teasing really well. Jem, on the other hand, has a higher tolerance level and is able to resist doing anything uncalled for when someone rudely insults Atticus. This shows that Jem reacts better to the taunting and teasing better than Scout, however, Jem lost his control when Mrs. Dubose called his father rude names in front of him and his sibling. He eventually cuts up and destroys the bushes loitering in her front yard when he passes her house on his way back home. Atticus punishes the two of them and tells his children that it is not necessary to…show more content…
Dill’s sudden appearance in Maycomb for the summer surprises Scout because she was not expecting to see him. As an even more surprise Dill suddenly appears from underneath Scout’s bed, but she was nevertheless thrilled to see him. She was not expecting to see Dill until next summer, but due to certain circumstances Dill had decided to run away from home and to Maycomb. He stayed with the Finches for one night and was eventually allowed to stay in Maycomb for the rest of the summer with his aunt. Although Dill is back in Maycomb, this summer is not the same as the last one. The major difference is that Atticus is preparing to defend Tom Robinson this summer, whereas he was not the previous year. The children had to encounter a lot of problems as a result, one of which included an angry mob trying to kill Tom. Along with the conflicts that they faced, the trial was also that year, so they attended it to show their support for
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