Social Control Theory

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As William James has said “consciousness is a stream. Words such as ‘chain’ or ‘train’ do not describe it.” Taking the analogy further but with crime would showcase an unidimensional description of how deviance occurs would be the same as describing it as a train, as it is bounded by a track and never deviating from that point can be seen as analogous to Thornberry’s (1987/2011) view of earlier social control theories. A stream would then describe the trajectories that Thornberry (1987/2011), Sampson and Laub mention (1993/2011), where certain streams may have a fork that leads to two different paths, with new paths being created through erosion, this gradual buildup is similar to that of mutable nature of social control and social learning.…show more content…
The critical number lies at age 21, with persistors having been convicted both before and after that age 21. The age group of 10-13 where they first began offending and convicted has nine offences on average, whereas the 14-16 age group has six offences on average (Farrington et al., 2006, p. 2). These two age groups consist of subjects with the most convictions (with a grand total of committing 77% of the offences in the entire study) is consistent with the Interactional Theory and the Turning Point theory, based on Interactional Theory’s reciprocal loop, on how delinquency values, behaviours and the association with delinquent peers are mutually reinforcing (Thornberry, 1987/2011, pp. 246,251), where delinquency is strongest as delinquent values are less of an emerging value system, but a rather consolidated one; also aligning with the Turning Points Theory on its mentioning of state dependence along with cumulative continuity, in that interactions with delinquents leading to more delinquency is again a mutually reinforcing force (Laub and Sampson, 1993/2011, p.…show more content…
State sanctions is important in where incarnation can negatively impact job prospect despite desistance from crime after an incarnation. State sanctions bring in the question of class (Laub and Sampson, 1993/2011, p. 266), as Sampson and Laub (1993/2011) points out, middle-class boys are less likely to be sanctioned while as a delinquent therefore not impacting their future, also in Thornberry (1987/2011, p. 252) mentioning how middle-class boys are much more likely to not be in criminogenic environments.On the contrary, despite the negative effects of early negative sanctions, at age 48, desisters are just as successful in life as the unconvicted, as compared to the data at age 32 where desisters have significantly lower life success (Farrington et al., 2006). It is of no surprise to see that late-onset offenders to be deemed less successful in their lives than desisters, as late-onset offenders start gathering social capital at a later stage after losing their initial social
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