Social Intelligence Theory

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Its roots can be traced back to the world of Charles Darwin who worked on the importance of emotional expression for survival and adaptation. The term first came into picture in the year 1985 when Wayne Payne published his doctoral thesis on A Study of Emotion: Developing Emotional Intelligence. This proposition was mainly based on the impression that society’s historical repression of emotions is the source of all sorts of problems such as depression, obsession, illness, religious conflict, fierceness and war. Prior to this work, this term had appeared in Leuner in 1966. In 1989, Stanley Greenspan put forth an EI model followed by Salovey and Mayer in 1990. Daniel Goleman then popularized the term and built in various related concepts in his…show more content…
Seal, Richard E. Boyatzis and James R. Bailey tried to provide a theoretical model of the process whereby Emotional and Social Intelligence (ESI) is fostered in organizations. ESI studied the behavioural proficiencies and their impact on performance. ESI roots back to 1920 where Thorndike suggested three types of intelligence: abstract, mechanical and social. McClelland (1973) and Boyatzis (1982) gave an inductive way of determining the hidden potentialities of a person in producing effective performance called competencies. Sternberg (1985) continued with the social intelligence tradition and developed the theory of successful intelligence. Bar-On (1985) established the path between social and emotional intelligence. EI also is known as Emotional Quotient. Salovey and Mayor (1990) defined EI as the subset of social intelligence that involves the ability to monitor one’s own others’ feelings and emotions, discerning among them and use this information to guide one’s thinking and actions. Emotional and Social Intelligence helps to distinguish the behavioural exhibitions of the interpersonal awareness of others’ emotions, needs, thoughts and perceptions and to navigate the larger social environment and working with others. Defining ESI as single construct may be misguided due to attribution of halo effect and articulation, which can be deceptive and suggest a close association with cognitive…show more content…
Hess said that little research has been put into how the behaviours associated with EI can be applied practically to improve both individual and group decision making approaches. He swotted applicable emotional intelligence literature and identify some real approaches to the application of emotional intelligence skills to the decision making process. But how it can be done was a big question in front of the decision makers. Salovey and Grewal (2005) came up with an ability model which comes up with requirements to exercise the following skills: perceiving and using, understanding and managing
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