Social Movements And Globalization Analysis

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The book “Social Movements and Globalization” by Cristina Flesher Fominaya is a dissection of intriguing concepts relevant to the political and economic processes of the last century along with the global desire for social transformation. Fominaya’s eight chapter book focuses on the understanding of the dynamics of social movements through their challenges with globalization. Accordingly, the author explains the impact of globalizing trends through the development of various social sectors, such as the expansion of neoliberal policies to present her findings. She manages to capture the complexity of both to further understand the way they influence one another by developing her arguments from the insights of social and cultural studies within…show more content…
She identifies the types of movements that develop within social movements through explaining that not all social movements aim for a progressive change but instead some work to return the society to the way it was before the occurrence of a “change”. From that, the author draws an explanation for why social movements matter by highlighting their impacts on institutions and their abilities to dissolute political regimes and states and allow the emergence of new ones. Moreover, she moves on to define globalization by elaborating on its complexity through its homogeneity and heterogeneity. With both characteristics diversifying globalization at both ends, the emergence of global civil society and global values is witnessed to shape the development of a global consciousness. Through these establishments, global social movements expand to mobilize as networks on national and international…show more content…
This section of the book begins with a review of the disputes that took place in Seattle in 1999, key moment in the birth of the GJM The author stands here a succinct portrait of the innovations of GJM in the transnationalization of social movements. She is also interested in lively debate between autonomous fringes of the movement and supporters of the institutional left which will take place throughout the existence of this organization. Therefore, while the institutional left movement tended to a vertical organization of the movement to maximize the effectiveness of pressures applied to different political actors, independent rather aimed at a horizontal and egalitarian organization of their movements, aimed much more influence public policy makers. The policy foreshadowing - prefigurative politics - proves to be their tactic of choice. Although it is normal that the presence of these two tendencies within the same movement generates tension, the author believes that these two poles would benefit from being considered as a complementary rather than in
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