Social Realism In Sherman Alexie's Literary Works

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3. Social Realism in Sherman Alexie’s Literary Works If we scrutinize the literary works of Sherman Alexie, we can realize that social realism has been impacted in most of his writings, especially, poems, short stories, and novels. Alexie wants to show a faithful image of social reality of postmodern age through creating characters, plot- construction, and themes. Alexie wants to highlight his subtle attitude towards social issues of his home country. What he wants to share with the people of the postmodern era is, equally true for any country of any age. Consequently, this submission is prepared to introduce social realism of Alexie’s age so that we can get a clear-cut concept of psychological conflicts of both man and woman. Alexie never writes about…show more content…
Thomas Builds-the-Fire, a misfit storyteller of the Spokane tribe; Victor, an angry alcoholic guy and Junior, “the happy-go-lucky failure” appear both in the novel, Reservation Blues (1995) and in the short story collection, The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fist Fight in Heaven (1993). Alexie calls these three characters “the unholy trinity of me.” Undoubtedly, these characters bear the testimony of his social reality because Alexie wants to unmask the alcoholic addiction and cruel traits of human character. The protagonist of Indian Killer is a Native American, who was adopted out by a white couple. According to Alexie, Indians call Indian children adopted out by non-Indian families “lost birds.” One of Alexie’s cousins was adopted out, which inspired him to create such character. Here the novelist has shed a new light of his autobiographical issues through his protagonist. In this regard, Alexian Indian Killer can be compared with David Lawrence’s Sons and Lovers. Both novelists have focused on their own familial conflicts, forbidden attraction, psychological trauma of their respective age, because both Alexie and Lawrence have tasted the

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