The Civil Rights Movement

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“The civil rights movement was based on faith. Many of us who were participants in this movement saw our involvement as an extension of our faith. We saw ourselves doing the work of the Almighty. Segregation and racial discrimination were not in keeping with our faith, so we had to do something.” -- John Lewis
The civil rights movement started in 1946 and ended in the late 1960s, it was started by African Americans to end discrimination against them and gain equality. The variety of movements were mostly nonviolent and they did it to protect their individual, economic, political, and social rights in America, regardless of their sex, skin color, or birth origin. The movements were about a lawsuit in court to mass protest in cities.
Inequality
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The governor Orval Faubus deploys Arkansas National Guard to prevent 9 black students from entering the school they were know as the “Little Rock Nine”. Till president Dwight D. Eisenhower sent federal troop to escort the student although they still were being harassed.
On August 28, 1963 there is a march called “The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom” in front of the Lincoln Memorial with around 250,000 people. Martin Luther King. Jr delivered his speech “I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.”’ He also discusses to an end on racism and a change in economic and civil rights.
In August 6, 1965: President Lyndon Johnson signs the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the law ended segregation on public places and discrimination on employment due to religion, color, sex, race, or birth origin. An also the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) help prevent workplace
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The civil right movements broke the pattern on public places that were being segregated by “race” mostly in the south. All of this achieved were breakthrough to gain equality rights for African Americans. The civil rights movement main principle was to be done with nonviolence and civil disobedience. Martin Luther King believed it was essential for the civil rights movement not sink to the level of the racists and haters who opposed
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