Social Structure In John Steinbeck's Of Mice And Men

610 Words3 Pages
Have you ever had a dream that seemed almost impossible? Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck shows the destructive imbalance of social power structures in American society. The importance of idealized relationships between men, or the social structure, is proven by the many characters that live on the farm. Because of this unspoken structure, multiple characters have goals and dreams to have a better life, but George and Lennie prove the impossibility of the “American Dream.” Think of social structure like this: superintendent, principal, teacher, student. This is an example of a social structure in our everyday lives. In Of Mice and Men, there is an unspoken structure that affects the men and how they treat each other. Curly and his father would be the highest on the social ladder. Curly is the person that everyone knows is in charge and will cater to. George is in the middle of the pack as a worker on the farm. As of Lennie, because of his mental disabilities, he does not have much say. The unspoken social structure on the farm changes the perspectives of the way people act towards each other. Bromance is a word for a close, emotionally intense, platonic bond between…show more content…
Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck shows the destructive imbalance of social power structures in American society. The importance of idealized relationships between men, or the social structure, is proven by the many characters that live on the farm. Some are at the top, while others are so far below the bottom, they are not necessarily considered within the structure. While the American Dream is real for most people, there are people that will not be able to obtain in, like Lennie, and perhaps even George because of his relationship with Lennie. Like George said in chapter one, "guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don't belong no place.” Not all dreams come
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