Societal Norms In The Case Of Cody Kimewon

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Rational choice or societal norms? Perhaps in the case of Cody Kimewon who has been in and out of jail cells since the age of thirteen, its is the interaction of self interest and culture that has driven him into a cycle of dubious encounters with the law. From home to home as a foster child, and from jail cell to jail cell as a petty criminal, Kimewon fought homelessness and happenstances with the law throughout his young adult life. Could he be reacting to the surrounding externalities as a member of a tribe, as a minority facing sociopolitical and economic disadvantages a typical white Torontonian may not be? Or is it an inherent cyclical culture of crime associated with Tribal members who are fundamentally deprived of societal standings …show more content…

What is alarming about this situation, is that he had more than 60 charges to his name before he turned 18. The efficacy of this program needs to be addressed, however, its benefit to those who become part of it is worth the tradeoff. Kimewon, since early on has been detached from his family and society as a result of his behavior. Instead of being directly sent off to prison, Kimewon had the opportunity to reconnect with his indigenous roots and learn more about where he came from through this alternative justice program. The community council program also aided him in fighting addiction as well as help him attain his high school diploma. What he struggled with became his great successes through this program. Kimewon is just one of the individuals who have benefitted from this program, and will help create a healthier community as opposed to a toxic …show more content…

Kimewon’s unique situation provides insight as to why he has made such progress. Disconnected from his family and his tribe, the young adult did what had to survive, and in turn fell into dangerous behaviors such as drug and alcohol abuse. It is the case that his dilemma had to do with a nurturing of poor behavior by means of his societal standing and resulting lack of opportunity for growth. The marginal benefit of this interaction of the indigenous council however is slow. This brings us back to its actual effectiveness of reducing crime. Although those who participate in the program do reduce their engagement in crime, however it does not reduce incentive to affect crime before it happens initially. It is also difficult to identify whether or not Kimewon would’ve engaged in more crime or not, due to the fact that he incurred 59 charges after the fact of being put into the program. If a non-aboriginal youth were to enter the program, it would be of no use to that individual. An alternative to this Aboriginal Justice Strategy would have to be put in place for there to be an equivalent due to the tribalistic nature of the

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