Society In Brave New World

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The society one lives has a great impact on the person one becomes and the relationships they hold with other people. Aldous Huxley’s novel Brave New World is set in a futuristic and technologically advanced society. It directly parallels that of the 21st century, or even Huxley’s own 1931 London, England. Things that are considered too ‘taboo’ and ‘obscure’ such as multiple sexual encounters and erotic play amongst children are the norm in Huxley’s utopian society. Through Huxley’s writing techniques, distinct style and carefully chosen, vivid diction, he paints the picture of two individual societies, one which mimes the world of a reader in today’s day and age, and another which leaves the reader curious, intrigued and appalled at …show more content…

John the Savage is the epitome of reality in the brave new world. He has the knowledge of religion and William Shakespeare, knowledge that is stowed away from the technologically manufactured people he meets on the brave new world. This makes things difficult when John tries to express his feelings to Lenina Crowne, a woman of the brave new world. He is able to express his thoughts, while she mechanically repeats the same hypnopaedic mottos such as, “Ending is better than mending. The more stitches, the less riches.” (Huxley,53). “The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place”- George Bernard Shaw Lenina feels she is expressing her desires for John, based on how the brave new world citizens act towards each other. Another fascinating literary technique Huxley uses is the use of allusions. He fills the story with many historical allusions, spanning from the names of his characters, such as Bernard Marx, named after Anglo-Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw and Communist Manifesto writer Karl Marx, to the inventions introduced throughout, such the Malthusian …show more content…

A writer’s style is a characteristic that sets them apart from other writers, makes their writings identifiable and identifies the education level of the targeted reader. Huxley has his own unique style that sets Brave New World apart from other utopian fantasies. He uses complex diction and even words that didn’t exist at the time of his writing, such as soma, the drug that takes all pain away, and Centrifugal bumble-puppy, a futuristic version of today’s tetherball. Huxley also writes sentences that can take up to five lines, which shows he is able to write in a very nitty-gritty way; he gets right to the point. Huxley’s word choice and tone are carefully chosen as to enhance the story of the new society people to be driving towards. Huxley is also an expert at switching the tones between his characters. In a conversation with the director, John the Savage becomes frustrated with the crazy society he has been brought to, “I ate civilization. It poisoned me; I was defiled. And then…I ate my own wickedness” (Huxley 241). He much rather prefers the peace and open mindedness of Malpais, the savage reservation on which he grew up. Huxley manages to get

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