Sociology Of Religion

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Sociology of Religion The origins of Sociology in its self is considered a new practice which began in the early nineteenth century, and has only been around for approximately 200 years. This is a very short time compared to other practices. “The renewed global importance of religion from North and South America to South and East Asia, from Europe to the Middle East and Africa has had a profound impact on the sociology of religion,” Hinnells, J. (2010). The populous was no longer separated by geographical location thanks to the innovations in travel, and technology. Therefore, this led to a population explosion where people migrated to urban areas. The modernization of the world had begun to transform our societies by exposing…show more content…
The birth of sociology began with French philosopher Aguste Comte who became one of the first to use and apply this new method of study in the analysis of society. Comte wanted to use scientific facts in his quest to study the world, and saw sociology playing a central role in guiding it in a time of social change. Our cities began to grow, and religion flourished causing a dramatic shift in our lives. The three individuals most responsible for the modernization of sociology was Emile Durkheim, Max Weber and Karl Marx, these were three of the major thinkers in the discipline of sociology of religion. Durkheim, Weber, and Marx also had extensive training and education in other fields of study. All three had intended for their contributions to enact social change, by focusing on social issues, such as religion. Max Weber: Max Weber was born April 21,1864 in Prussia (Germany) and was a German sociologist and economist. Weber has made many important theoretical contributions to sociology and is regarded as one of the founders of this discipline. One of Weber’s…show more content…
Durkheim attempted to recognize the social role and origin of religion and how it related to societal companionship and like-mindedness. Durkheim also had an interest in recognizing similarities in other religions believing they might have a common foundation. Durkheim’s defined religion as, “A unified system of beliefs and practices relative to sacred things, that is to say, things set apart and forbidden -- beliefs and practices which unite into one single moral community called a Church, all those who adhere to them,” (Durkheim E., 1995) In his definition Durkheim does not mention God, and asserts the idea of supernatural is fairly new and connected to the growth of science. Durkheim suggests that there are religions lacking the significance of a God, like Buddhism which base their beliefs on the Four Noble Truths. “we are left with the following three concepts: the sacred (the ideas that cannot be properly explained, inspire awe and are considered worthy of spiritual respect or devotion), the beliefs
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