Socrates Morality Analysis

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BACKGROUND Socrates was convinced that our souls are where virtues and vices are found, they are vastly more important for our lives than our bodies or external circumstances. The quality of our souls determines the character of our lives, for better or for worse, much more than whether we are healthy or sick, or rich or poor. If we are to live well and happily, as he assumed we all want to do more than we want anything else, we must place the highest priority on the care of our souls. That means we must above all want to acquire the virtues, since they perfect our souls and enable them to direct our lives for the better. If only we could know what each of the virtues is we could then make an effort to obtain them. As to the nature of the virtues,…show more content…
If so, Socrates does not have courage, because Socrates plainly has no fear in any of these situations. He seems to have no fear of death at all. So what if Socrates does have courage, we will have to abandon the common assumption about what the relation between courage and fear. Socrates’ courage is not the ability to stand fast against fear. It is the ability, based on knowledge, to have no fear of death, while remaining fearful of doing injustice. A confusion of Socrates intensions on courage is set through what Woodruff has said about him. It leads one to wonder whether Socrates was courageous through his own life as well, or was he one to just motivate others and head for a downfall himself. The advice that he gave others was of great importance and it was nothing but the truth. Following what he adviced people to do, students in particular, you would never go wrong when you took his advice and success was guaranteed. We have learned that courage is to some extent the absence of fear, now the fact that the above quote states his absences of fear to death, it contradicts to this statement as a whole. According to my point of view though it is unlikely that a person could advice people to do something good and he/she strives to be different by not doing the same. When it comes to my own personal view on Socrates, I believe that he…show more content…
Women and young girls were discouraged to receive a proper education as men and young boys. “I know you’re still young, but I want you to understand and learn this now, Marriage can wait, education cannot. You’re a very, very bright girl. Truly, you are. You can be anything you want, Laila I know that when this war is over, Afghanistan is going to need you as much as its men, maybe even more, because a society has no chance of success if its women are uneducated, Laila. No chance” (Hosseini, 2009: 103). These are words from father to daughter, words of encouragement. Despite the rules and regulations of Kabul at the time, Hakim encouraged Laila to attended school and enrich her knowledge. To Laila this was not a problem because she had her own dreams and aspirations, and marriage not being one of them. She wanted to become something of great importance so that she could bring change to her home town. It took her real courage to understand that it is through education that a son of a miner can be the head of the mine, a daughter of a cleaner can become a Doctor, that it is through education that she can bring change to Kabul. She understood that education would help her and everyone else in Kabul understand the difference between right and wrong, that an uneducated person is well aware of the consequences of the laws that are set in Kabul and the Soviets war, but he/she is not influenced to do
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