Solution-Focused Brief Therapy Analysis

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Developed by Steve de Shazer and Insoo Kim Berg, Solution-Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT), is a behavior based, goal oriented, treatment system that focuses on the present and future, rather than past experiences, to find solutions to problems (Goodtherapy.org, 2016). This paper will explore Solution-Focused Therapy, its core constructions, approach, and techniques. Core constructs Berg and de Shazer (as cited by Fiske, 1998), used three principles to direct their philosophy when creating SFBT: (1.) “If it isn’t broke, don’t fix it” (p. 186). (2.) “If it’s working, do more with it” (p.186). (3.) “If it is not working- do something else” (p.186). Additional core constructs include the theory that the client’s complaints are due to behaviors that…show more content…
It was determined that it would be more productive to spend less time talking about problems, and more time finding solutions that would provide realistic, reasonable, and quick relief (Berg, n.d.). It is believed that the individual already possesses the tools to solve their problems, and that by examining those times when the problem is not present or is less severe, the solutions can be found (Seligman & Reichenberg, 2014). This approach empowers and encourages the client, provides them with hope for their future, and enables them to utilizes tools that already work for them, rather than learning new techniques that work for someone else (Berg,…show more content…
Berg working with a female client who wishes to lose weight. In the beginning of the video, we see Dr. Berg demonstrating an optimistic view of human nature, rejecting the medical model of pathology, and focusing on the positive as she compliments her client on her ability to accomplish the things she sets her mind to; using her success of working, going back to school, and raising two children as an example to reinforce this. As the conversation continues, the client tells Dr. Berg that she believes that she uses eating as a “way out” and then explains that she finds herself snacking late at night when she is worrying about things. Rather than focusing on the problem of eating when worrying, Dr. Berg begins to assist her client in looking for solutions to her problem by asking her about her prior cigarette and drug use, as well has her accomplishments of ceasing their use. She asked client if it was the “same thing” for her when she smoked cigarettes. The client told her that she used cigarettes and drugs to fit in and be more interesting to others, but later stopped. Dr. Berg then asked her if she believes that the approach to eating is different than her approach to ceasing drugs and alcohol, to which she says that she believes she needs a different approach. Dr. Berg then asks her what could be different, to which she talks about changes she could make to her diet. In this manner, Dr. Berg and her client are working together to identify
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