Sonnet 130, And The Wife Of Bath's

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It is undeniable that there have been numerous authors that have left lasting impact because of their work. However, many have debated which author has produced the greatest piece of literature. Authors like Shakespeare, Chaucer, and Milton are often the ones in the running. The truth is, they were all great. So many authors have proven their pure genius threw their creations. Their work has inspired not only other authors, but readers, even to this day. There are many authors we still study today because of their extraordinary ability to produce such timeless and insightful pieces of literature. The texts that have impacted me the most are Shakespeare’s Sonnet 116, Shakespeare 's Sonnet 130, and Chaucer’s The Wife of Bath’s Tale. The first…show more content…
Shakespeare was exceptional at writing sonnets. He produced 154 sonnets during his life. Sonnet 116 and Sonnet 130 are two of his more popular sonnets. Sonnet 130 is also about love. Shakespeare again presents the theme of this sonnet in an unconventional way. Shakespeare is describing the girl he loves, however, it surprisingly sounds insulting. Shakespeare compares her to many images of beauty like the sun, coral, roses, and even a goddess and expresses how she doesn 't compare to any of their beauty. He finishes however by saying, “And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare as any she belied with false compare.” (lines 13-14) I love the ending of this poem. Shakespeare is saying even though she not as good as all the things he compared her too, she is still rare to him. He expresses how she is misrepresented by the ridiculous comparisons any woman is subjected to. Likewise to Sonnet 116, I not only enjoy the topic he addresses in this sonnet but agree with his response to it in relation to being in love. Shakespeare 's profound expression of his love is breathtaking and I enjoy how he is able to find words that so perfectly communicate what he is trying to

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