Sonnet 18 Anne Bradstreet Analysis

1053 Words5 Pages
“…We are invited to see this significance in the perspective of the poem … but through our own perspective…” (Simecek, 504). The techniques of explaining your perspective can prove to be a rather challenging task. The authors William Shakespeare and Anne Bradstreet do just this. With the use of multiple literary devices, the poets used emotions and feelings to make you understand the connections between the author and subject. The perfect examples being the two titles, “Sonnet 18” and “The Author to Her Book”.
The use of poetry to describe the beauty of the world is a common trend in history. Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18, is a common example of the description of beauty within the world and in humans. Shakespeare uses a comparison of a summer day
…show more content…
Just as Shakespeare did, she uses a comparison to a relatable subject. She used her literature as her child, but unlike Shakespeare, she does not believe that her subject is perfect. Charlotte referred from the beginning of the piece to the work being “ill-formed” meaning full of grammatical mistakes and how the work no matter how much she tried to mend it she still did not see it as perfect.
Both poets also hold a very close relationship to the subject of the poem. The attachments are alike in the matter that the author uses common metaphors. In Sonnet 18, Shakespeare compares the individual to the summer days which is something the reader can relate to. The feelings of a physical attachment to his subject’s beauty show that William was obsessed with looks instead of the emotional connections that are needed for an intimate relationship.
Unlike the relationship that Shakespeare depicted in his Sonnets, Bradstreet’s relationship was entirely different in nature. The relationship she had with her work was very intimate and caring. However, the feelings of intimacy were more of a paternal instead of a romantic like Shakespeare had depicted. She describes creating and maintaining her work from beginning to end just like childbirth and raising which for many females in the seventeenth century was all, but expected for the
Open Document