Sonnet 18 And Anne Bradstreet's Contrast

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“…We are invited to see this significance in the perspective of the poem … but through our own perspective…” (Simecek, 504). The techniques of explaining your perspective can prove to be a rather challenging task. The authors William Shakespeare and Anne Bradstreet do just this. With the use of multiple literary devices, the poets used emotions and feelings to make you understand the connections between the author and subject. The perfect examples being the two titles, “Sonnet 18” and “The Author to Her Book”. The use of poetry to describe the beauty of the world is a common trend in history. Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18, is a common example of the description of beauty within the world and in humans. Shakespeare uses a comparison of a summer day…show more content…
The idea that “…poetry presents us with images, ideas, concepts, which connect in such a way that makes the experience of the whole poem meaningful with a deep sense of significance. This shows that the perspective can come apart from a narrative structure.” (Simecek, 503). This means that not everyone will have the same experience with the work of literature as another and just because one individual feels that there is a strong connection between two characters when in the authors perspective may not be the case. The thoughts that we associate with these images may cause our own perspective shift which is true in all works of…show more content…
The meaning of the poem being to describe an individual that William obviously holds in high romantic standing. Yet due to the complex wording of the poem many readers may believe it is describing life in general or the beauty of youth which is a well-known theme of Shakespearian novels. The Sonnet collections were written in the early 1600s which is the time of the English Renaissance in the Elizabethan era. This was around the time when romance in literature started to become popular. Shakespeare’s Sonnets use the common templet of fourteen lines with a couplet. William uses a standard three quatrains with iambic pentameter. Within the first quatrain, the speaker begins with an attention grabber and then begins the description of the day. The next one displays signs of a Volta with the description of the negative parts of the summer day and the mentions of a decline in nature. The final stanzas, he begins to state that the individual’s beauty will never fade even in death. The couplet ends out with the immortalization of the
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