Southern Coastal Aboriginals Analysis

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In this paper, I examine the influence of Captain James Cook 's conquest of the Southern coastal indigenous aboriginal clans, and his influence on the Western perception. I discuss Western biases noting our cultural biases of the European explorers, their descriptions of indigenous Aboriginals, and comparing these to the written and archaeological records. I look at comparative literature, the Australian government and Aboriginal heritage resources, and the archaeological record along with scholarly articles to determine the likely reaction of the coastal aboriginals to the European settlers. I also examine how the European records of contact may have affected biases against the Southern coastal Aboriginals. It is my assertion that a negative,…show more content…
The written records of European expansion have been notorious for single-sided misleading accounts. The trend in colonialism, a more or less seek-and-destroy concept, has colored the European expansion of the Pacific Islands in a prolonged tale of indigenous catastrophe. Prior to the contact and exploration of the Sydney region of what we know as Australia, the aboriginals were a relatively mysterious people. It wasn’t until Ferdinand Magellan had initially made contact that European explorers and map makers became intrigued in the Southeastern coastal region. The land was well cared for, the people were non-hostile, and we had no filter or narrow lens in which we critically viewed their culture. They existed by themselves, for themselves and for their land, and there was no dominating aspect about them that would provoke the idea of warfare (Alistair…show more content…
After repeated contact, the natives of struggled to adapt to the colonial systems and customs and European culture. The colonists imparted both religious and governmental institutions, extending their beliefs and customs, eventually oppressing the natives through forceful habitation. Ceasing control over the natural resources, and even the indigenous peoples themselves, the colonists dominated the land, making a crisis of culture and forcing the Aboriginals to find ways of preserving native tradition. The introduction of Europeans in the coastal regions of Terra Australis set up a time line of events that would not only be detrimental to the indigenous peoples as a culture, but to their ability to function in a newly dominated European government. Captain Cook, who likely discovered the Australian coast after his observation of the transit from Venus and Tahiti (Princeton University 2010), respectively. He had blatantly lied about the population (citing that there was none, the land was unoccupied as a method to gain the consent of occupation by the natives) (Resture 2007). Cook was entangled in his own ideas of what proper civilization should look like, and over-sympathized with the “poor creatures” (A Brief Aboriginal History 2016-2017), as if he was creating his own dramatic
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