Spiderman Hero

2527 Words11 Pages
Spider-Man. Captain America. The Flash. What do all of these superheroes have in common? These characters came from the human subconscious desire for salvation. However, in modern day literature, we often see a twist on the typical hero, the anti-heroes. The anti-hero defies classification as a hero, for they lack the typical heroic qualities. On the flip side, they also defy classification as a villain. Although the character may have flaws traditionally seen in villains, these types of characters have honorable or heroic intentions that draw in the audience. Most often these characters come across as awkward, obnoxious, or dishonest, which ultimately lends itself to their status as a flawed or failed hero. The main character of a Netflix…show more content…
In the past hundred years the United States underwent or experienced several major changes. Most prevalently, the Vietnam War, student protests, two Kennedy assassinations, and the Civil Rights movement. Not only did these events consist of some of the worst acts in human history, but many of our parents and grandparents lived through them firsthand. Their own personal experiences lead to socially questionable behavior. As the United States engaged in these events, citizens began to lose faith in heroes because no one was stepping up to the plate to save them. Throughout the modernization of society, the idea of a “valiant hero” has fallen to the wayside as a cultural impossibility due to the norms of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. The world was black and white no more, rather it was shades of gray, which resulted in the big screen reflecting these new views on morally acceptable behavior. The classic hero became un-relatable to the audience and thus the modern day anti-hero was born. Characters like Shane Walsh from The Walking Dead shine as a prime example of a broken character. We no longer see the virtue of the people around us, instead we see the flaws and brokenness which characterize their humanity. We become more likely to relate with a character if we can see our own character flaws reflected back to us through them. The audience becomes riveted, watching…show more content…
I am an unattractive man. I think my liver is diseased. Then again, I don 't know a thing about my illness; I 'm not even sure what hurts” (Dostoevsky). The Underground Man is displaying a lack of courage in his thoughts. The Underground Man is relatable instantaneously in his confusion and snarky manner, which many readers also possess. So much like myself, Dostoevsky portrays a life of second-guessing decisions made and having the “what if” moments, where he has lived a doubtful life. People form connections between their emotional turmoil, a side effect of self-regret and petty thoughts, and relate it to the experiences of the Underground
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