Spoken Standard Australian English

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The differences between the written and spoken seem to obvious but when looked at closely there are many differences in the structure, amongst these include the way grammar, and vocabulary are used and how they vary between context (Crystal, 2005). Throughout this report the context focus is the written and spoken differences in the home, In an Early Childhood classroom, teenagers on social media as well as Speaking and Writing Aboriginal English in the home community and at school. Speaking and writing Standard Australian English at home Spoken Standard Australian English: The home environment is a place to relax, where the rules of social interactions and communications are not as stringent. For example a conversation between two parents…show more content…
During this example it is evident that the teenager is using abbreviation to shorten their sentence. This use of this colloquial language has been developed as a result of restriction of limited characters aloud in a text/instant message as well as speeding up instant messaging (Reed, 2014). Speaking and Writing Aboriginal English When exploring Aboriginal English it is important to note that while Indigenous languages vary between Aboriginal country, many languages have been lost or phased out over the years (Tory, 2012). A direct cause of this loss is the result of Indigenous peoples being denied their own languages during the time of forced assimilation (Tory, 2012). As traditional Aboriginal languages evolved it formed the many dialects of Aboriginal Englishes that is present today (Harrison, 2011). Spoken Aboriginal English In its spoken context between a teenager and an elder Aboriginal English still supports many of its traditional cultural rules from the past. For example it is a sign of disrespect to look your elders in the eye during conversations and the name of a person who has passes away should never be spoken (Harrison,…show more content…
According to the Board of studies, Teaching and Educational Standard for NSW, (2015) this is because the spelling system of Aboriginal is based on phonemic orthography, which means that the letters only have one sound. When choosing to communicate in a written context rather than a spoken such as an Aboriginal teenager writing a story meaning can be lost when comparing it to a spoken context. This is because the written form is usually denies the reader hand gestures, facial expressions and long pauses to that supports the stories meaning (Eades, 2013). In summary, the difference between written and spoken Englishes depend on context, audience, environment and structure. This report identified just a few of the many Englishes used every day to communicate across different registers. It highlighted areas where the line gets blurred such as instant messaging on Facebook book, while exploring the notion of code switching between different
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