St. Thomas Aquinas Summary

1111 Words5 Pages
Chapter 4
The Metaphysical Notion of Person in St. Thomas Aquinas

“God created humankind in His own image”
(Genesis 1:26)

In chapter two of this research, the researcher tried to explore St. Thomas Aquinas’ notion of participation giving emphasis on the third mode of participation where an effect is said to participate in its cause. The elucidation of the notion of eternal law in St. Thomas Aquinas’ philosophy has been laid down. This was done to show that the one being participated has a law which should be the guiding principle in all actions.
In chapter three, the researcher tried to explore the concept of euthanasia with specific discussions about active euthanasia and the different arguments in the contemporary period therein. This is done so as to give emphasis on the central problem that the researcher saw in this academic pursuit.
After drawing upon the basic foundations of this research, this part now comes to the point of
…show more content…
Overview

The vastness of St. Thomas Aquinas’ thought can be seen in the network of his works. The consistency of his thoughts is evident and are nonetheless considered as one of the most systematic philosophies of all times.
In understanding the thoughts of St. Thomas, one must go into the core of his philosophy and theology. In treating his philosophical enterprise, one should keep in mind the heart of his philosophical milestone - God. Thus, in Aquinas’ thought, God is the beginning and the end of all human existence.
St. Thomas Aquinas’ discussion on man as an Imago Dei occurs in question 93 of the first part of Summa Theologiae. This he entitled: “The End or Term of the Production of Man.” In analysing this pursuit, the researcher would give accounts to understand the human person as an Imago Dei, participating in God’s esse.
The researcher would first discuss the notion of God and some of His attributes that are deemed significant in this academic pursuit, i.e., God as efficient, exemplary, and final cause of all
Open Document