Stamina In Night By Elie Wiesel

1002 Words5 Pages
On January 30th, 1933, one of the most deadliest and dangerous genocides had begun, the Holocaust. Approximately 6 million Jews lost their lives in the concentration camps. A well known survivor from the Holocaust is Elie Wiesel. He was put in a concentration camp at the age of 15 and died recently in 2016. In his memoir, Night, Elie demonstrates a remarkable amount of stamina when faced with seemingly insurmountable obstacles by not giving up his chance to live and caring for others. To start off, by showing affection for loved ones and encouraging others to keep fighting, Elie displays an enormous amount of mental stamina when presented with extreme conditions throughout his life. Elie observes, “Lately, he had been wandering among us,…show more content…
A quote that supports this is, “Where are You, my God? I thought angrily. How do You compare to this stricken mass gathered to affirm to You their faith, their anger, their defiance…” (Wiesel, 66). Elie starts to feel that God is no longer there for him at the concentration camp. Individuals may think this does not indicate spiritual stamina because he is questioning his religion because of what he is living through. Elie describes, “Why, but why would I bless Him? Every fiber in me rebelled. Because He caused thousands of children to burn in His mass graves? … Because in his great might, He had created Auschwitz, Birkenau, Buna, and so many other factories of death…” (Wiesel, 67). Elie acknowledges that he no longer wants to believe in God because he concluded that God is the reason that the Jews are in the circumstance they are in. This is another reason individuals might think Elie is showing lack of spiritual stamina during the Holocaust because Elie begins to consider why he should believe in God when He has created such terrible things throughout the world. On the other hand, Wiesel explains, “And in spite of myself, a prayer formed inside me, a prayer to this God in…show more content…
As fellow Jews at the camps started to give up, Elie encouraged them that there were things to live for and that they would survive the Holocaust, notwithstanding when the chances were slim. When his dad was sick, Elie cared for him such as giving him water even when he wasn’t supposed to, hoping that his father would survive. Even in the hardest conditions and labor Elie was put through, he never lost hope and kept on fighting until liberation. Wiesel also prays to God with hope that there will be a life for him, his friends, and family after the Holocaust. To conclude, Elie has proven to be mentally strong after confronted with unrealistic situations throughout the harsh era of the
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