What Are The Pros And Cons Of Standardized Testing

1204 Words5 Pages
Addison Kenny
1/16/18
Block 5
Standardized Testing : The Great Debate Standardized testing was created and implemented to quiz and challenge students’ intelligence of their knowledge on a certain curriculum. The standardized tests were also implemented in hopes of promoting student growth. However, opponents question if standardized tests truly test one’s knowledge and intelligence, and if it also promotes creativity and divergent thinking or if it lacks it. In addition, the curriculum required for the teachers to follow could raise difficulties regarding learning. Furthermore, standardized tests have created an inquiry regarding the effectiveness of the schooling system. Standardized tests are intricately fabricated to test in
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However, certain questions on these examinations could have another debatable answer, but students aren’t given the opportunity to explain and defend why the other answer could work just as well. Cookie-cutter and superficial questions that have set answers deny students the ability to truly think and express their reasoning and thoughts. Teaching and instructing young children to search for the right answer is fallacious. Certain test questions have the possibility to attain two right answers or no right answer. A pensive child may choose an answer that is credible or could be proven conceivable through explanation, but instead, the answer is judged as “wrong.” “ As a teaching tool, the tests are deeply flawed because they quash imagination, creativity, and divergent thinking. These are mental habits we should encourage, not punish.” (Diane Ravitch). Additionally, some pro-standardized testing people claim that higher scores are proof that the examinations are necessary, although these higher test scores might just shows the student’s ability to take a test, instead of actually indicating their intellect. It’s incredibly arduous to create a multiple choice question that enables a student to reveal what they can do with what they have learned (Roger Farr). Students who are truly challenged and are given the opportunity to think of a different way to solve a problem, are the same people that drive innovation and ingenuity in a successful society. These divergently thinking children are the same people that have the ability to grow up and solve some of the world’s greatest issues. However, from such a young age, their disparate and fresh perspective on life is suppressed, which can easily sabotage any growth in
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