Star Wars A New Hope Analysis

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This body of work will analyze the story Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope. In this writing, there will be distinct illustrations and examples of how this story is a prime example of the Hero’s Journey. Many archetypes will be found throughout. A long time ago in a galaxy far far away, approximately nineteen years after the formation of the Galactic Empire, the galaxy was in a state of civil war. The Rebel Alliance had made their first major victory over the Galactic Empire, by stealing the plans of the Death Star, the Empire’s secret weapon that can destroy planets. Princess Leia Organa, in hopes that these stolen plans could restore freedom to the galaxy and save her people, attempts to flee aboard her ship. Her ship is then intercepted and is boarded by Imperial Stormtroopers and Lord Darth Vader. Before she is found by them, she records a holographic message on a droid, R2-D2, in the hopes that he can deliver that message to a Jedi living on the desert planet of Tatooine. Before Princess Leia is taken hostage and her ship is destroyed, R2-D2 and another droid, C-3PO, use an escape pod to get to Tatooine. Once the droids are on Tatooine, they are captured by native creatures. Those creatures then sell R2-D2 and C-3PO to a moisture farmer named Owen Lars and his nephew, Luke Skywalker. Luke, while cleaning…show more content…
The Quest, a situational archetype, is what the Hero must accomplish to restore peace, order and normalcy to a troubled land. In Star Wars, Luke goes an a Quest to restore peace that was unbalanced by the civil war between the Galactic Empire and the Rebel Alliance. Luke must leave his home and get the Death Star plans to the Rebel leaders. He also must destroy the Death Star. Another situational archetype is the Initiation. This is where the Hero comes to maturity and is faced with new awareness and problems. For Luke, this would be when he learns to use the
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