Starbucks Human Resource Analysis

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It has been expected to those familiar with the company's human resources management policies and work culture when in January 2005 Fortune magazine placed Starbucks Coffee Company second among the largest companies for "Best Companies to Work For." Starbucks stood out for its employee-friendly policies and supportive work culture. The company was especially noted for the extension of its benefits program to part-time workers – something not many other companies offered. As pointed out by IBS Center for Management Research (2005) Starbucks cared about its employees and was one of the few companies in the retail sector to provide generous benefits to both full time workers as well as part timers. This ensured that employees remained motivated…show more content…
Starbucks realized early on that motivated and committed human resources were the key to the success of a retail business. Therefore, the company took great care in selecting the right kind of people and made an effort to retain them. If an organization’s human resource policies are designed properly, the selection practices will identify competent candidates and accurately match them to the job and the organization (Robbins and Judge, 2013). Further, Noe et al. (2010) also point out decisions such as whom to hire, what to pay, what training to offer, and how to evaluate employee performance directly affect employees’ motivation and ability to provide goods and services that customer value.As a result, the company's human resource policies reflected its commitment to its…show more content…
Since countries have different laws, human resource managers need to understand societal issues, such as status, that might affect operations in another country (DeCenzo and Robbins, 2010). However, at Starbucks, the partners are involved in formulating the best policy for them, and each suggestions or ideas are respected by top management. Starbucks even wants every employee to join in making and developing plans, then achieving their goals all together. As a result, the policies and principles are communicated between all staffs, and there is no limitation in employees’ personal opinions. This practice is in line with a research done by The Great Place to Work Institute (2008) that finds the best management practice for creating a work culture that achieves superior performance is when employees trust the people they work for, have pride in what they do, and enjoy the people they work with (Collins,
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