Stereotypes In The Movie 'The Breakfast Club'

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The Breakfast Club is a movie that was released in 1985. This classic movie was written and directed by the famous John Hughes. The movie revolves around five high school students who are forced to attend Saturday detention and write an essay about who they think they are as a person. Every main character comes from a different clique. There’s the jock, Andrew; the popular girl, Claire; the nerd, Brian; the rebel, Bender; and the odd girl, Allison. These five students all believe they have nothing in common with one another, but as time passes on they realize they have more in common than they think. The Breakfast Club is a timeless film that goes deep inside the mind of teenagers and destroys the stereotypes of typical high school students by showing there is much more to a person than their outward appearance may suggest. The best decision John Hugh’s made when writing The Breakfast Club was deciding to have the five characters represent the most common types of cliques that can be found in high school. The five characters each have a different personality and this gives viewers the opportunity to each have a character that they can relate to. By being able to relate to the characters, viewers are able to connect with the movie on a personal level. It…show more content…
In the beginning of the movie, the students knew nothing about each other, but because of stereotypes, the characters assumed they knew all about each other. It was easy for the non-popular students to assume that the popular kids had a perfect life but, as the movie progresses, they learn that the group a person belongs to does not determine the type of problems they face. The problems they discuss deals with peer pressure, family issues, bullying along with other problems. While discussing their problems, they begin to understand each other and themselves. The five students unconsciously answer the essay prompt through these

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