Stereotyping In To Kill A Mockingbird

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Stereotyping is a general idea that someone uses to view someone before they actually get to know them. In To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Scout, Jem, and Dill stereotype people until Scout’s father tells her to stop stereotyping. Harper Lee suggests that in order to fully understand someone, you must learn to see the world from their point of view. Mrs. Dubose is an example of Harper Lee’s idea because at first she acts mean towards the Finch family which cause Jem to destroy her camellia flowers. When Mrs. Dubose dies, Atticus tells the kids that the reason she was so mean was because she had a morphine addiction. Then Jem “picked up the candy box and threw it in the fire. He picked up the camellia, and when i went off to bed I saw him fingering the wide petals”(149). The candy box is what is holding the camellia. This shows after Jem realizes what Mrs.Dubose was going through. He had a fit of rage and later he realized what that meant and then felt regret, if he didn’t feel regret he would have most likely thrown the flower in the fire as well instead of holding it. With Mrs.Dubose’s death, Jem shows how you must learn to see the…show more content…
Heck then says the Bob fell on his knife because “to my way of thinkin’, Mr. Finch, taking the one man who’s done you and this town a great service an’ draggin’ him with his shy ways into the limelight--to me, that’s a sin”(370). Heck Tate is saying that if Atticus goes ahead and tells the town that Boo Radley saved his kids, then everyone will want to reward him for saving children, and with Boo being so shy, it would be a sin to do it. Then Scout tells Atticus that telling everyone would be like killing a Mockingbird. Scout looks from Boo’s point from view by seeing why Heck doesn’t want him getting gifts and being called a
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