Woods On A Snowy Evening

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From the words of America’s sixteenth president Abraham Lincoln, “you cannot escape the responsibility of tomorrow by evading it today.” The speaker of the poem “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” written by Robert Frost recognizes this as he comes across a beautiful and calming forest where he longs to stay and bask in the overwhelming peacefulness. The newfound forest mocks the speaker with an offer of tempting freedom, however he recognizes that responsibility cannot be ignored for selfish longings.
In “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” by Robert Frost, the speaker falls upon a deep and peaceful forest where he longs to stay and free himself of all crushing responsibility. It is implied that the speaker is in the midst of a metaphorical dark place as he
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The title “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” gives insight into the poem and can change the interpretation. The use of the word “stopping” is subtle foreshadowing to the decisions the speaker will end up making. As he is passing through the woods, he is faced with the internal conflict of deciding whether he should stay and watch the snow fill the woods or continue on his journey. It can be inferred from the title that the speaker is going to make the choice of moving forward. On top of this, the poem includes intense imagery describing the wonderful woods the speaker stumbles upon. He describes the woods as “lovely, dark and deep” (13) as he stands and admires. The speaker feels at peace saying that “the only other sound’s the sweep / of easy wind and downy flake” (11-12). Unaccompanied and carefree, the speaker spends his time admiring the beauty and peacefulness of where he stands. Frost also uses phrases including onomatopoeia such as “he gives his harness bells a shake” (9) and “the only other sound’s the sweep / of easy wind and downy flake” (11-12) to appeal to the senses and bring the woods to
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