Stranger In The Village And Learning To Read By Fredrick Douglass And James Baldwin

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Compare and contrast In reading the brief essays Stranger in the village and Learning to read by Fredrick Douglass and James Baldwin, I found myself not interested in reading because of the large vocabulary that I did not recognize. Nevertheless, I read them over again along with listening to them, which helped me to understand the vocabulary better. They both spoke about the negatives they faced being black. Still, they had different stories to tell. James wrote about moving to a place and being the only black person, no one knew yet everyone wanted to know about and Fredrick wrote about his trials and tribulations of learning to read as a black man. After analyzing these passages and genuinely trying to put myself in their position, personally I enjoyed Stranger in the village more than Fredrick Douglass’s Learning how to read. The reason for this is that James wrote more in a way that made me feel as if I was with him and he was telling a story. For example, James Baldwin starts off by saying, “I was told before arriving that I would probably be a "sight" for the village; I took this to mean that people of my complexion were rarely seen in Switzerland, and also that city people are always something of a "sight" outside of the city.”(22) While in contrast, in Learning to read the feeling was more of a calculated biography that clarifies by what means he had to attempt to learn reading with every opportunity presented to him. As an example, Fredrick Douglass wrote, “I

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