Power Of Strength Training Summary

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“The Power of Strength Training” is an article written by Mandy Oaklander published in the Times magazine.Through this article Oaklander reveals the benefits of strength training especially for women. According to Oaklander women tend to stay away from strength training because of the misconception of becoming too muscular. A few of the benefit of strength training, she mentions is that it reduces the risk of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.Oaklander gives examples of exercises that can be done anywhere without a gym membership or weights.Strength training is one of many exercise people tend to stay away from, but Oaklander does a good job trying to persuade the readers to begin strength training through the use of pathos, logos,…show more content…
Oaklander starts her article with a personal story by sharing it, she is trying to encourage readers who can relate to her sister to start strength training, if someone like her sister can do it anyone can. “Dr.Dena Oaklander, a psychiatry resident who also happens to be my sister-is the last person you’d ever expect to become a bodybuilder.She’s naturally scrawny and a little bit shy, not the type of person to beast out at the gym-or so I thought”(Oaklander 40).This following quote inspires curiosity, so readers are going to want to read more about the topic, furthermore, if it advocates good health.“Strength training also comes with the less visible benefit of lowering risk for several diseases”(Oaklander 44). Persuading someone is very difficult, but Oaklander uses words that inspire motivation which is another form of pathos like the following quote: “strength training is the only way you’re going to truly be able to sculpt the physique of your personal dreams”(Oaklander 40). By using words like “the only way” helps Oaklander’s argument sound stronger and invoke…show more content…
Readers that don’t have a lot of time to work out can relate to this next quote; “those who did at least 120 minutes a week of aerobic exercise and some strength training had a Type 2 diabetes risk 65% lower than women who didn’t do either”(Oaklander 45). By including numbers and percentages she is trying to helps readers visualize what she is implying, for instance, if the readers do the math they will find out it only takes about 20 minutes a day to get results and to lower the risk of diabetes. Oaklander wants everyone to relate to her article that is why she incorporates the following study, “a 2017 study showed that when frail women over 60 who were obese worked out with resistance bands for three months, they dropped body fat and increased bone density”(Oaklander 45). Including facts like these one Oaklander reveals that strength training can help people of all ages and that you don’t necessarily need weights to get
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