Student Success In Mathematics

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This thesis introduces the characteristics of students succeed during the education process generally and mathematics particularly and it answers the questions like what are the characteristics of a successful student? Or what are the factors affecting student’s success? Through this research, you will be familiar with the concept of success in math teacher’s perspectives, especially student’s success inside the class which leads students a step ahead to succeeding in math lessons and even in the other lessons that require more to be focused in class.
Classroom instruction is accepted as a central component for understanding the dynamic processes and the organization of students’ mathematical thinking and learning (Cai, 2004; Gardner, 1991;
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Teachers are central to classroom instruction in mathematics and have a major impact on students’ learning. Consequently, if our aim is to improve students’ learning of mathematics, one fruitful line of endeavor is to investigate the characteristics of effective mathematics teaching. Much of the early research on the effectiveness of mathematics teaching focused on teacher knowledge of mathematics (Thompson, 2004). Teachers’ beliefs about mathematics, mathematics learning and mathematics instruction can also impact on teachers’ instructional practices (Beswick, 2007; Leder, Pehkonen, & Törner, 2002; Wilkins, 2008), although the contextual nature of beliefs means that it is unwise to expect consistent links between beliefs and practice. While teachers’ beliefs have been described by Pajares (1992, p. 307) as “a messy construct”, their influence on instruction is sufficiently accepted to warrant further investigation. This research focuses particularly on how teachers view effective teaching of mathematics. One of the unique features of the book is this reliance on the views of teachers as the primary sources of data for each chapter. Hence, teachers’ voices are…show more content…
Because classroom instruction plays such a central role in students’ learning, researchers have long tried to characterize the nature of the classroom instruction that maximizes students’ learning opportunities (Brophy & Good, 1996; Floden, 2001). Teachers are central to classroom instruction in mathematics and have a major impact on students’ learning. Consequently, if our aim is to improve students’ learning of mathematics, one fruitful line of endeavor is to investigate the characteristics of effective mathematics teaching.
Much of the early research on the effectiveness of mathematics teaching focused on teacher knowledge of mathematics (Thompson, 2004). Teachers’ beliefs about mathematics, mathematics learning and mathematics instruction can also impact on teachers’ instructional practices (Beswick, 2007; Leder, Pehkonen, & Törner, 2002; Wilkins, 2008), although the contextual nature of beliefs means that it is unwise to expect consistent links between beliefs and practice. While teachers’ beliefs have been described by Pajares (1992, p. 307) as “a messy construct”, their influence on instruction is sufficiently accepted to warrant further
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