Summary Of Hard Knocks

781 Words4 Pages
In the article, “Hard Knocks” by Gabriel Charles Tyler, it discusses how football players suffer from head trauma, and concussions. Some of those players continue playing even with their injury, or wait until they are healed and return to help their team win the season. Many players get permanent damage, can sometimes commit suicide, and hundreds more continue to suffer in pain. Football is a life threatening sport that 94% of American teenagers who got tackled, ended up with severe brain injuries. A High School Football player, named Bryce Monti, was about to make a routine tackle, but then suddenly knocked heads with one of his former teammates, and he quotes, “When I got back up, I saw two scoreboards.” “I was out completely.” Bryce suffered…show more content…
According to “Upfront” magazine they state in the article” Hard Knocks” that fifty percent of Americans don’t want their children to play football, because it involves tackling, which results in injuries. A typical High School football player receives an estimation of six hundred hits on the head, per season, according to the University of Michigan’s Neurotrauma Research Laboratory. Nine thousand and five hundred concussions were among teenage football players in the United States and at least eight died this year. Football has the highest rate of catastrophic head injuries. Researchers have proved that children who play football before the age of twelve are most likely to develop memory problems. Scott, who plays in the New York Jets stated: "I don 't want my son to play football. I play football so he doesn 't have to... I don 't want to have to deal with him getting a concussion and what it would be like later in…show more content…
If parents let their children play football, they’re taking a chance on the safety of their children. What sane parent can do that—take a chance with his child’s life? Apparently, Ed Riley, brother of Mike Riley, Nebraska’s head football coach. According to Ed Riley, the question: Is football dangerous can be answered with an unequivocal no. In fact, Ed Riley says that football is no more dangerous than glee club, band, or choir. Riley cites a study by the Mayo Clinic which looked at seniors who played football from 1946 to 1956 on high school football teams in Rochester, Minnesota. This was back at a time when football headgear was not as protective as it is today. The researchers were looking to see if these now-elderly former football players were more likely to have developed Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and dementia. They weren’t. There was no significant difference in the number of ex-football players with these conditions, compared to those who did not play the game, back in the day. Is football dangerous? Not according to Ed Riley and the Mayo
Open Document