Corruption In Martin Luther's Letter From Birmingham Jail

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For many years, the African-Americans were not heard and experienced problems of segregation. This situation suppressed those people and was seen as a sign of corruption of the society as well as the sign of corruption of the souls. This situation showed that African Americans cannot feel free in this situation. In regards to this, the way things went in Birmingham was a way worse than in other parts of the US. While people chose the way of demonstrations to overcome this corruption, some clergymen representatives published a so called Call for Unity in the newspaper. In this appeal they called the process of defending rights of people unwise and untimely. As a response to this claim, Martin Luther wrote his Letter from Birmingham Jail, reflecting the African American desire to get…show more content…
The African American revolution started in 1950s represented a range of protests by black people against segregation and for freedom. They chose direct action to reach their goal – “they marched, picketed, went to jail, and suffered harm, pain and inhumane acts” (Letter from Birmingham Jail). After the protest in Alabama has failed, Martin Luther turned to Birmingham, where his house and family was set under attack because of his active position. It resulted in his more active participation and organization of further opposition. In the letter, Martin Luther described Birmingham as “probably the most thoroughly segregated city in the United States. Its ugly record of brutality is widely known” (King, 79). He wanted to stop the disease of segregation by direct action. “The Letter from Birmingham Jail” explains Luther's attitude to the problems of African Americans and shows an advanced use of the language means to persuade people. Thus it can be identified as a successful examples of an inspiring argumentative piece of
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