Summary Of Plato's Cave In Fahrenheit 451

1129 Words5 Pages
Ray Bradbury born in 1920 to a middle class family. Bradbury went on to write and publish over five hundred pieces of literature. One of the novels he wrote was Fahrenheit 451, where he attempted to predict what the United States of America would look like in the future. The novel illustrates the idea of a totalitarian government and society burning books to stop the spread of knowledge, by following the development of the main character Guy Montag. Furthermore, the novel bring up the idea of Plato’s cave, in which Montag attempts to overcome the ideas of the society he grew up around. Plato’s Cave portrays prisoners captive in a cave and forced to look at the shadows projected on the wall in front of them for their entire life, until one…show more content…
Blake burns herself alive. The third stage of Plato’s Cave may show through the actions of Montage after Mrs. Blake ignites herself on fire and Montag begin to question why firemen burn books once he finds out the importance of literature. After the incident with Mrs. Blake Montag comes home to feel ill, and Mildred confronts him about Mrs. Blake and the books that burned in the fire. Mildred says, “She’s got you going and the next thing you know we’ll be out, no house, no job, nothing” (Bradbury 48). In the stage of freedom in The Allegory of the Cave Socrates Describes that a prisoner in the cave would then drag out of the cave by force. Tying this to the case of Montage, he is being dragged out of his “cave” by Mrs.Blake after she kills herself by burning herself and her books when Montag and the other firemen show up to her house. Consequently, Mildred is not worried about the women or the books she is only worried about material items and herself, not opening herself to question the lives of others around herself. Once Montage beings reading the books he has kept hidden in the vent he becomes confused on what the meaning of them are, so he contacts an English professor named Faber to answer questions about the books. Faber says to
Open Document