The Partition Of India

1539 Words7 Pages
India is a country, well known for its composite tradition of peace and co-existence. Accordingly, love or fellow feeling among its people plays a vital role in the nation’s pursuit of peace and a substantive inspiration for a common good. All the limitations of border, nation, race, culture, class and community come to nothingness, because it believes in the uniformity of humanity. The history of Indian partition is, therefore, of paramount importance to mankind. The precipitous shame and violence inflicted upon humanity is not only chronicled by the historians, literature also re-creates and presents its untold truths by fictionalizing this colossal desecration of human values in the form of rape, large scale burning of dwelling and a mass…show more content…
Jayanti Basu, a practising psychoanalyst, in her book, Reconstructing the Bengal Partition: The Psyche under a Different Violence, has pertinent implications in the study of the partition of India. India has ever remained a salad bowl of different peoples of different tastes, languages, cultures, and religions, because India has strong belief in peace. Moreover, a non- violent approach, forgiveness, sympathy with the weak and the downtrodden, respect and amity for the new comers, consciousness of a divine mission to bring happiness to all and above all, to treat every one as a part of God constitute the concept of humanity in India. Consequently, it is the very heterogeneity of Indian culture that makes it historically possible for different religions and cultures to survive and to mutually enrich themselves in their own way. Furthermore, the ancient Indian culture admitted the variety of human nature, variety of tastes, views, approaches etc. Not anyone is regarded superior to the other. This humanist approach of the Indian philosophy has a worldwide attraction from time immemorial. Mother Teresa, Sister Nivedita and many other great men and women from all over the world, settled life long in India to discover the spirit of humanism and its philosophy. The teachings of the Vedas, the Upanishads and the Bhagvad Gita work deeply in the unconscious of the Indian mind. It is unfortunate that India had to suffer political unrests and religious riots…show more content…
They fought against the useless Hindu customs like ‘Satidaha’ and Child Marriage and the penury of the widows. Moreover, they attempted to let the Bengali society free from religious prejudices through women education. Ramakrishna, Ma Sarada and Vivekananda in the nineteenth century, advocated that all creatures on this earth are part of the supreme God, and therefore, there is no need of any external religious formalities to know the god separately. Vivekananda emphasized on a society where the highest truths could be lived and exercised. He also pointed out that society cannot be constructed until its people are free from the entanglement of starvation, malnutrition, prejudice and illiteracy. Rishi Arabinda Ghosh (1872-1950) and Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941), too, had great contribution in the development of humanism in Bengal, who thought that religion is no abstract idea, but exercising the principles of humanism. However, if the partition of Bengal bears with it two curses, and if the first one is violence and trauma, the second one is malnutrition, illiteracy and blind prejudices. This paper, therefore, proposes to explore Sunanda Sikdar’s Dayamoyeer Katha , where the politics of border and all kinds of societal discrepancies get nullified with the triumph of
Open Document