Summary Of The Next Canada

970 Words4 Pages

In The Next Canada: In Search of Our Future Nation Myrna Kostash assesses the future of Canada, one that she argues is different from her own generation. For the purpose of this research paper I will focus on Kostash’s subsection on culture and media – pages 65 to 76. It begins with the nexus generation, the group of individuals who bridge two periods of technological popularity: Industrial and Information (Kostash 65). This group, who was born between the early 1960s and late 1970s, have a unique ability to acknowledge the past while also living and understanding new wave technology as it grew. Kostash argues that mass media became the language of the generation and their ability to understand its broadcasting was a skill – they were experts. …show more content…

She develops her argument around small alternative print based magazine media that targets a specific group of people depending on its geographic location and moves to CBC radio and its larger collective voice that spans generations. Kostash presents the development of media in Canada optimistically, differentiating it from that of her generation but arguing that both the older and younger generations can successfully so-exist in a changing world. Nothing the author said was particularity puzzling or surprising since my historical knowledge of Canada and the baby-boomer generation is quite …show more content…

Though, Innis was focused on the experience, it seems are though Kostash was more interested in hearing something different than what she already knew. She did not wish to focus on what Canada used to be, but what others thought Canada would become. I would argue that Kostash’s understanding of technology and how it changed society relies heavily on the understanding of time and space, much like Innis. Kostash presents media and technology as something society continues to grapple with. Personally, I am always interested and concerned with the way media has been used to develop national sentiment and interpersonal relations. It affects people in myriad ways. Take the nature of political campaigns today; it has extended beyond radio and newspapers, to television and Internet. There is always intent to try and reach a larger audience, one that has grown up in an age where technology is virtually impossible to

Open Document