Summary Of The Shipman Case

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As lead prosecutor, the evidence and facts in Dr. Shipman case that was overlooked by the Greater Manchester Police Department which could have ended Dr. Shipman’s criminal activity sooner could have kept three other women from dying. In March of 1998, when Dr. Linda Reynolds of the Brooke Surgery in Hyde catalyzed alerted the deaths of Dr. Shipman patients to Deborah Massey of Frank Massey and Son's funeral parlor. Mrs. Massey noticed Dr. Shipman had signed an unusual amount of cremation forms for his elderly women patients. Dr. Reynolds also spoke with John Pollard, the coroner of the Greater Manchester about the deaths of Dr. Shipman’s patients. Dr. Reynolds was concerned about the high death rate among Shipman's patients, and the number …show more content…

(Saferstein, 2015) The Greater Manchester Police Department could have ended Dr. Shipman killing spree had they alerted General Medical Council once again before the lives of three women were taken after Dr. Shipman was released from General Medical Council investigation. (Criminal Profiling Staff, 2002) There was not enough evidence to convict Dr. Shipman; considering, diamorphine can hardly be detected in the body fluids after 5-6 hours; nevertheless, hair follicle test can detect the presence of heroin in your body even after months or years. (Netdoctor, 2015) Dr. Shipman’s weapon of choice diamorphine helped keep the murders undetected because death from diamorphine is evidently similar to the death of old age. (Netdoctor, 2015) The search of physical evidence must extend beyond the autopsy room of the deceased. A drug-induced death, drug levels may not always provide proof. (Saferstein, 2015) As a routine, tissues, and organs must be examined by a pathological and toxicological; however, the majority of Dr. Shipman’s patients did not receive these two examinations, but the 15 victims that did receive these test were able to convict Dr. …show more content…

Shipman constituted the surrounding circumstances of cremation to the majority of his patients. The protection of the body and the overall crime scene is critical. However, there was no crime scene due to cremation of Dr. Shipman’s patients. As lead prosecutor, I would have only been able to charge Dr. Shipman with the deaths of his patients who deaths were determined due to Dr. Shipman trying to cover up the deaths by committing forgery, and falsifying his patient’s medical records; however, that’s grounds for reasons of suspicious to investigate. In regards to so little evidence or evidence of such poor quality, I was unable to form any view at all. It was inevitable that there would be some cases where the evidence would not permit the reach of a definite conclusion one way or the

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