Violence In Ngugi's A Grain Of Wheat

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In fact, this violence describes as a counter-discursive strategy in Ngugi 's novel. Ngugi wants to draw adequate attention that the British colonizers taken away African 's land and freedom, the white turned the Black into slave. So in order to destroy slavish mentality, it should be used violent acts, as advocated by Mau Mau 's fighters: ‘We must kill. Put to sleep the enemies of the black man’s freedom…. If we are weak, we cannot win. I spit at the weakness of our fathers’ (216–17). Thus, the violence is a significant revolutionary strategy to restore justice and freedom. obviously, Ngugi claims that ‘‘violence in order to change an intolerable, unjust social order is not savagery: it purifies man. Violence to protect and preserve an unjust,…show more content…
Simon Gikandi in his book, Cambridge Studies in African and Caribbean Literature, declares that the violence which dominates A Grain of Wheat derives from Ngugi’s influence by Frantz Fanon, he mentions that Ngugi, after reading Fanon’s essays on violence as an instrument of liberation, he comes to consider the emergency in Kenya as the powerful stage of African resistance against the British colonial regime. Ngugi argues that since colonialism has initiated violence as a weapon to conquer and rule, Africans have no alternative but to use it as an instrument to smash down the European authority…show more content…
Education is significant tool because it raises the awareness against dehumanization. For that, Ngugi fights and identifies his society with the western education as imported product of colonization, in doing this, the colonizers spread Christian doctrine in school. For instance, the white man came to the country, clutching the book of God in both hands, his tongue was coated with sugar; his humility was touching… soon people saw the Whiteman has imperceptibly acquired more land … Elders of the land protested. They looked beyond the laughing face of the Whiteman and suddenly saw a long line of other strangers who carry not the Bible but the sword. (10-11) through these lines, it might be said, the Christian missionaries are an instrument to convert the natives and establish the rules of colonization especially in the
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