Summary Of What's Wrong With Cinderella

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Cinderella Article titled “What’s Wrong with Cinderella” written by Peggy Orenstein, covered five areas about the “Princess” trend in the 21st Century. Orenstein states facts, feminist views and third party, reasoning to support and oppose her views on the princess craze. The opposing data does not prove there are long or short term health or well-being effects or damages from the data collected. Orenstein gives an inter-dialogue with the pros and cons of marketing to young girls on its health effects and its well-being damages to young girls that experience the princess craze. Orenstein agrees young girls are not allowed to be themselves. That is what is wrong with the princess craze. We allow brainwashing …show more content…

According to the Orenstein, Marketing is used in the 21st Century to influence children at a very young age in a variety of ways to give illusions about the child’s sexual role.” Disney and Mattel both show the Princesses dressed up in beautiful, vibrant colors and children love this trend. The marketing incites girls to want to buy into the Princess Fairy Tale lifestyle. The glittery girl brand has gone viral with songs and other products to keep children wanting more. Girl make-over parties are also a marketing tool that grabs the attention of young girls. Parents pay $22.50-$35.00 per child for these makeover parties. Orenstein shares a response from the mother of a small girl when they visited a local girl’s beauty party. The response from the parent was “A lot of it is horrible. It makes them look like little prostitutes. It’s crazy. They’re babies! ”. (73) Next, Orenstein tells her audience about her feminist views the mother of a young girl. On how (experiences affect girls well-beings warning parents that a pre-occupation with body and beauty is perilous to their daughters’ mental and physical health” …show more content…

It’s crazy. They’re babies!” This statement gives perspective into why the Princess craze has gone too far and has affected girls and changed how they view their bodies. This statement supports the author’s main point , “ I’ve spend much of my career writing about experiences that undermine girls’ well-being, warning parents that a preoccupation with the body and beauty (encouraged by films, TV, magazines and. yes, toys) is perilous to their daughters’ mental and physical health” (65). It is because clothes make children look like prostitutes that Orenstein has taken such a stance on the princess craze and how it has affected the way girls view themselves in the world. Women must take a stand and acknowledge that marketing to children has gone too far. The advice is that you can protect your girls from the princess craze by encouraging your child in other ways to be kind, caring and have a good time in

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